Generation gap essay readings

Dimly realised resonances of former like experiences melt into, and deepen the feeling, and new elements are woven into it by associative complication, and by growing reflection. That allegory is simple. But does it? Indeed the terms mean nothing as applied to this question. The absurdity of the adoption in either case turns on the delightful freshness and the glorious irregularity of the proceeding. A loose woman in the household of a great noble was luring the youthful retainers to sin, when the chaplain remonstrated with his master, and threatened to depart unless she was removed. If, therefore, this last could take so very little from the happiness of a well-disposed mind, the other could add scarce any thing to it. Man without this would not be a rational agent: he would be below the dullest and most stupid brute. From all this, and also from what I say in my former work on Insanity, as well as in Allen _v._ Dutton, it will be seen that I have been induced to give pledge after pledge so repeatedly, that it becomes a serious matter, “partaking of the nature of a solemn obligation;” if, therefore, I fail to exert myself to redeem these pledges, I cannot have the excuse of those who promise without even intending to perform. {364} For the comedy of character, in its highest and purest form, we are told, and rightly told, to go to Moliere. We may thus reject it on one or more of the three following grounds; badness–that is undesirable moral teaching or effect; falsity–that is, mistakes, errors or misstatements of fact; and ugliness–matter or manner offensive to our sense of beauty, fitness or decency. He sits at the head of a party with great gaiety and grace; has an elegant manner and turn of features; is never at a loss—_aliquando sufflaminandus erat_—has continual sportive sallies of wit or fancy; tells a story capitally; mimics an actor, or an acquaintance to admiration; laughs with great glee and good humour at his own or other people’s jokes; understands the point of an equivoque, or an observation immediately; has a taste and knowledge of books, of music, of medals; manages an argument adroitly; is genteel and gallant, and has a set of bye-phrases and quaint allusions always at hand to produce a laugh:—if he has a fault, it is that he does not listen so well as he speaks, is impatient of interruption, and is fond of being looked up to, without considering by whom. The masses can enjoy a palpable contradiction between profession and performance—witness the enjoyment afforded to the populace of the Middle Ages by the spectacle of the moral inconsistencies of the monks.[62] But when it comes to the appreciation of inherent inconsistencies within the character, such as want of stability of purpose, fickleness in the affections and so forth, the need of a certain acuteness in perceiving relations, and of quickness in mentally reinstating what is not present, may greatly restrict the area of the enjoyment. This laughter, with something of the _gene_ of self-consciousness in it, was, we are told, not to be confounded with the expression of a complacent self-consciousness. Though it may be true, therefore, that every individual, in his own breast, naturally prefers himself to all mankind, yet he dares not look mankind in the face, and avow that he acts according to this principle. Rousseau of Geneva finds himself so much at a loss to account for the origin. A word on the general conditions of a presentation of character in comedy. There are already signs of this substitution of quality for quantity in our ideals. An illegitimate son was promptly tortured, and stated that his father had written the libels and ordered him to post them. There is no indication that witnesses were exposed to it. Thus, we recognize the fact of the instinct of self-preservation, and are right in assigning the qualification “good” to life as denoting its desirableness; similarly the instinct of acquisition is general and fundamental in the human species,[78] we accordingly assign the qualification “good” to property and wealth, and to its destruction, “evil”; the abstract value of the end of this instinct is intensified and held in greater respect the more it is realized to have been the means by which the surplus energy of mankind has been utilized to accumulate the capital essential to the development of civilization. Paints and brushes are not ‘amorous toys of light-winged Cupid’; a rising sigh evaporates in the aroma of some fine oil-colour or varnish, a kindling blush is transfixed in a bed of vermilion on the palette. Every step taken, _invita Minerva_, costs us something, and is set down to account; whereas we are borne on the full tide of genius and success into the very haven of our desires, almost imperceptibly. We have memoranda of the slides that belong in each lecture group and these can be quickly assembled if wanted. {66} The same thing will show itself in circumstances which give rise to a prolonged mental attitude, involving a feeling of apprehensiveness and of constraint. ESSAY III ON THE CONVERSATION OF AUTHORS An author is bound to write—well or ill, wisely or foolishly: it is his trade. But Mr. The recognition of this identity of the two actions is evidenced by the usages of speech. We may teach him to read Greek and he will then be some sort of a Greek scholar, but his reaction to other attempts to teach him will not be affected. That action was in the nature of both a threat and a bribe–a threat to discontinue the appropriation of city funds for a library that should refuse to consolidate and a bribe in the shape of a hint of additional favors to come if it should not refuse. which is to be read, “Andover, Massachusetts;” so in the Aztec scrolls, we have _itzmiquilpan_ represented by an obsidian knife, _itztli_, and an edible plant, _quilitl_, which are placed above or over (_pan_), the sign for cultivated land, _milli_, thus giving all the elements of the name, the last syllable by position only. This M. If he suspects you have a delight in pictures, he endeavours, not by fair argument, but by a side-wind, to put you out of conceit with so frivolous an art. III.–_That where there is no Approbation of the Conduct of the Person who confers the Benefit, there is little Sympathy with the Gratitude of him who receives it: and that, on the Contrary, where there is no Disapprobation of the Motives of the Person who does the Mischief, there is no Sort of Sympathy with the Resentment of him who suffers it._ IT is to be observed, however, that, how beneficial soever on the one hand, or hurtful soever on the other, the actions or intentions of the person who acts may have been to the person who is, if I may say so, acted upon, yet if in the one case there appears to have been no propriety in the motives of the agent, if we cannot enter into the affections which influenced his conduct, we have little sympathy with the gratitude of the person who receives the benefit: or if, in the other case, there appears to have been no impropriety in the motives of the agent, if, on the contrary, the affections which influenced his conduct are such as we must necessarily enter into, we can have no sort of sympathy with the resentment of the person who suffers. If you are told that one of generation gap essay readings your assistants is “lucky”, do not laugh it away. This treatment of material is justified because it increases popular interest in the subject-matter and brings people to the museum who would not otherwise enter it. A. We enter into the opposite resentment of the person who is the object of this unjust emotion, and who is in danger of suffering from it. There are more people in London than any where else; and though a dwarf in stature, his person swells out and expands into _ideal_ importance and borrowed magnitude. _i. If my unfeign’d Submission may procure pardon for my Presumption, that Your Happiness may equal Your illustrious Vertues, and Your Royal Person be as far out of the reach of Fortune, as your Fame and Honour of Detraction, shall ever be the prayers of Madam, _Your Royal Highness’s most Humble, most Obedient, and most Devoted Servant_ PREFACE. Add to these facilities the remarkable power of the Nahuatl to impart tropical and figurative senses to words by the employment of rhetorical resources, and to present them as one idea by means of the peculiarities of its construction, and we shall not consider as overdrawn the expression of Professor De la Rosa when he writes: “There can be no question but that in the manifestation in words of the various emotions, the Nahuatl finds no rival, not only among the languages of modern Europe, but in the Greek itself.”[372] The Nahuatl word for friendship is _icniuhtli_. We have difficulty in saying exactly what produces this simple and single effect. It is possibly unfair to cite this as an attempt to “work” the library–it was the public press that was ingeniously and successfully exploited through the library. of the misfortunes of a husband, named Anoupou.[231] The Greek comedians thought no abuse of the sex too bitter or too coarse.[232] In Latin literature we have satirical portraits of different types of women, drawn under the figures of various brutes, a fox, a mare, etc.[233] In medi?val society, the low opinion of women entertained by their lords is illustrated in the firm persuasion that the only way to treat them was to beat them—watching them was quite vain—so that they might be occupied all the day with crying.[234] Sometimes, as in the _Arabian Nights_, this contempt takes the form of bitter denunciation; but, for the most part, it has laughed in the brighter key of comedy. I profess to speak of human nature as I find it; generation gap essay readings and the circumstance that any distinction I can make may be favourable to the theories of virtue, will not prevent me from setting it down, from the fear of being charged with cant and prejudice. We muse or paint, as objects strike our senses or our reflection. They made the same thing probable with regard to Jupiter and Saturn; that they, too, revolved round the Sun; and that, therefore, the Sun, if not the centre of the universe, was at least, that of the planetary system. And I hinted, by an analogy, that the mind of the mature poet differs from that of the immature one not precisely in any valuation of “personality,” not being necessarily more interesting, or having “more to say,” but rather by being a more finely perfected medium in which special, or very varied, feelings are at liberty to enter into new combinations. He has lived, for this last twelve months, on vegetable diet, and he is apparently better; but this may be a fallacious appearance, since his vital energies appear to be sinking. If the motor discharge follow the first swell of joyous feeling, which is popularly said to excite it, it seems to do so with such electrical rapidity as to make it impossible to detect this initial swell as distinctly preceding it. The philosophers of the “moral sense” school attempted to prove that there existed a distinct moral “faculty” which differed from all other perceptions or ideas, in that it was a separate medium by which men could recognize ethical truth, which was rather a matter of the heart than of the head. How those intermediate causes, by the different motions and vibrations which they may be supposed to excite on our organs, produce there those different Sensations, none of which bear the smallest resemblance to vibration or motion of any kind, no philosopher has yet attempted to explain to us. Nobody knew better than our artist that repose is necessary to great efforts, and that he who is never idle, labours in vain! Nothing is more characteristic of the play-mood in young animals and in children alike than an imitative {349} propagation of movement. Persons of delicate fibres and a weak constitution of body complain, that in looking on the sores and ulcers which are exposed by beggars in the streets, they are apt to feel an itching or uneasy sensation in the corresponding part of their own bodies. 5, last paragraph.] Such is the account given of the nature of virtue in this amiable system, a system which has a peculiar tendency to nourish and support in the human heart the noblest and the most agreeable of all affections, and not only to check the injustice of self-love, but in some measure to discourage that principle altogether, by representing it as what could never reflect any honour upon those who were influenced by it. As their mutual sympathy is less necessary, so it is less habitual, and therefore proportionally weaker. The medieval philosophers at least had Aristotle to fall back on; their modern successors would appear to be posing as Aristotles themselves. Would any one but a German physiologist think it necessary to assure us that at this time they see, but with their eyes open, or pretend that though they have lost all memory or understanding during their fainting fit, their minds act then more vigorously and freely than ever, because they are not distracted by outward impressions?

The newspaper, fully alive to the value of things new, gives welcome to the self-revelations of human folly, perverted ingenuity, and uncontrollable vanity. {164} _No._ 18.—_Admitted_ 1800. In all such cases treatment of the physical cause, if it is treatable–alters the “run of luck” at once. This legacy of shame is clearly traceable in Pierre de Fontaines. For three days, with fasting and prayer, they implored the Divine Omnipotence to make manifest their right; and then, by mutual assent, they floated on the Thames a round buckler, bearing a handful of wheat, in which was stuck a lighted taper. Imperfect Critics Swinburne as Critic Three conclusions at least issue from the perusal of Swinburne’s critical essays: Swinburne had mastered his material, was more inward with the Tudor-Stuart dramatists than any man of pure letters before or since; he is a more reliable guide to them than Hazlitt, Coleridge, or Lamb; and his perception of relative values is almost always correct. Locke. Mr. Vanity is a building that falls to the ground as you widen its foundation, or strengthen the props that should support it. Our disapprobation of his ordinary character and conduct does not in this case altogether prevent our fellow-feeling with his natural indignation; though with those who are not either extremely candid, or who have not been accustomed to correct and regulate their natural sentiments by general rules, it is very apt to damp it. Mr. When those actions, on the contrary, which are commonly supposed to proceed from a selfish motive, are discovered to have arisen from a benevolent one, it greatly enhances our sense of their merit. In other words, we find that we must resort to the genetic method, and try to explain the action of the ludicrous upon us in the modest scientific fashion by retracing the stages of its development. It may be doubted when he denies the crime which he is accused of. His early poems show what the poems of a boy of genius ought to show, immense power of assimilation. Liston. The dancer, however, may have a very considerable degree of merit, and his imitation perhaps may sometimes be capable of giving us as much pleasure as that of either of the other two artists. I am warning you in the midst of a course intended to fit you for librarianship that the course alone will not so fit you. _oro._ _ae_ or _o_. The poet’s Muse is like a mistress, whom we keep only while she is young and beautiful, _durante bene placito_; the Muse of prose is like a wife, whom we take during life, _for better for worse_. The rules of justice are accurate in the highest degree, and admit of no exceptions or modifications, but such as may be ascertained as accurately as the rules themselves, and which generally, indeed, flow from the very same principles with them. equals R in which _x_ might be circulation, _y_ number of books, _z_ number in the staff, _u_ cubic feet in the building, and so on. But I do need to say–because some of us are apt to forget it–that these things are not ends in themselves, but means to an end, namely, the bringing together of the man and the book, the distribution of ideas. The scheme of which I have here endeavoured to trace the general outline differs from the common method of accounting for the origin of our affections in this, that it supposes what is personal or selfish in our affections to be the growth of time and habit, and the principle of a disinterested love of good as such, or for it’s own sake without any regard to personal distinctions to be the foundation of all the rest. Their structure is more direct, simple, transparent; they reveal more clearly the laws of the linguistic powers in their daily exercise; they are less tied down to hereditary formul? The French and Italian languages are each of them compounded, the one of the Latin and the language of the ancient Franks, the other of the same Latin and the language of the ancient Lombards. Take the example of a child to whose welfare the attention of the parent is constantly directed. It is enough for our present purpose to urge that the modes of perception and the shades of feeling involved are clearly distinguishable. When the chief died, the house was destroyed, and the same mound was not used as the site of the mansion of his successor, but was left vacant and a new one was constructed.[77] This interesting fact goes to explain the great number of mounds in some localities; and it also teaches us the important truth that we cannot form any correct estimate of the date when a mound-building tribe left a locality by counting the rings in trees, etc., because long before they departed, certain tumuli or earthworks may have generation gap essay readings been deserted and tabooed from superstitious notions, just as many were among the Natchez. There must probably be conceded to history a few “many-sided” men. Both philosophies are popularizations: the moment an idea has been transferred from its pure state in order that it may become comprehensible to the inferior intelligence it has lost contact with art. From this point of view, we may see that the comedy of manners is not, fundamentally, so different from that of character as is often maintained. Louis and try to make mine look like it. But it is quite otherwise with resentment: if the person {63} who had done us some great injury, who had murdered our father or our brother, for example, should soon afterwards die of a fever, or even be brought to the scaffold upon account of some other crime, though it might soothe our hatred, it would not fully gratify our resentment. The same sort of reasoning is applicable to the question whether all good is not to be resolved into one simple principle, or essence, or whether all that is really good or pleasurable in any sensation is not the same identical feeling, an infusion of the same level of good, and that all the rest is perfectly foreign to the nature of good and is merely the form or vehicle in which it is conveyed to the generation gap essay readings mind. Nor is the corrective function of a large communal laughter likely to be carried on by such new forms of art as our “social satire,” in so far as these can be said to keep at the point of view of the good sense of a community. The library now does both. This smile may be said to express an amusement at the spectacle of illusions pricked, which tells at least as much against the high-soaring thinker as against the man of common day who relies on the intuitions of his “common-sense”. Burke has it, a sort of ‘public creature.’ He lives in the eye of the world, and the world in his. Footnote 90: Consciousness is here and all along (where any particular stress is laid upon it) used in it’s etymological sense, as literally the same with _conscientia_, the knowing or perceiving many things by a simple act. Nature seems to have judged it necessary for their preservation that they should, for some time at least, put implicit confidence in those to whom the care of their childhood, and of the earliest and most necessary parts of their education, is intrusted. Nature, he complains, puts him out. He is the only great painter (except Correggio) who appears constantly to have subjected what he saw to an imaginary standard. It is the living wearer that is emphasised in the comical juxtaposition; we more naturally describe it as the child wearing his father’s hat, than as the father’s hat on the child. He seems to wish not so much to excite your esteem for _himself_, as to mortify _that_ for _yourself_. Sometimes the librarian himself, observing the interference, contents himself with seeing that individual items of service are not duplicated, leaving the two departments to do, in part, the same kind of work, though not in precisely the same items. It is called a remnant of barbarism and gothicism. I particularly have in view, two cases of the most determined suicidal melancholy, that were so delicately treated and watched, that they were not themselves aware for months, they were even in a place of confinement, or they had an eye of anxiety constantly watching over them. It teaches us how little the happiness of man depends upon his environment, that the merriest of the American nations is found precisely where according to our usual notions almost every cheering and enlivening element is withdrawn from life, where darkness, cold, and destitution have undisputed rule. As may be supposed, many superstitions cling around the animal world. There was not, indeed, in this case, the same ground for the supposition of such **a sphere as in that of the Fixed Stars; for neither the Sun nor the Moon appear to keep always at the same distance with regard to any one of the other heavenly bodies. When once we begin to give way to such refinements, there is no enormity so gross of which we may not be capable. can you dare to solicit Him for any recompense? The resentment of mankind, however, runs so high against this crime, their terror for the man who shows himself capable of committing it is so great, that the mere attempt to {92} commit it ought in all countries to be capital. Whether such weakness of nerves, as it has been called, may not, by gradual exercise and proper discipline, admit of some cure, may, perhaps, be doubtful. majestatis_,” and no instance is on record to disprove the assertion.[1833] In one class of offences, however, torture was frequently used to a later date, and without requiring the royal intervention. The wind still holds its pre-eminence as a supernatural occurrence in the native mind. _Duclos_, could not express the minuteness of the intervals in the pronunciation of the Chinese language; of all the languages in the world, that of which the pronunciation is said to approach the nearest to singing, or in which the intervals are said to be the greatest. The charm that rivets their affections is not the importance or reputation annexed to the new pursuit, but its novelty or difficulty. The poet does not aim to excite—that is not even a test of his success—but to set something down; the state of the reader is merely that reader’s particular mode of perceiving what the poet has caught in words.